Sneak Peek: Teaching Leadership

Think you’re not ready to be a leader? Too late, you already are! Gail Dickinson explains, “You decided to be a leader when you decided to become a school librarian.” As you will learn in her new video workshop, “Leadership is part of everything you do.”

In this six-minute sneak peak from her workshop, Gail Dickinson focuses on engaging parents in your school’s leadership curriculum. What do you want to ask of parents? How do you engage them in student learning in a meaningful way? Gail discusses how to identify what you want from parents and how to include them in building a culture of leadership at your school.

 

SLC subscribers can view the full workshop here.


dickinsonGail K. Dickinson, PhD, is associate dean of graduate studies and research at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. She earned her master’s in library science from the University North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and her doctorate in educational administration from the University of Virginia. Dickinson is a past-president of AASL, was editor-in-chief of Library Media Connection, and is the author of Achieving National Board Certification for School Library Media Specialists and coeditor of the seventh edition of Linworth’s School Library Management.

Growing Readers and Parent Involvement through Picture Book Month

picture-bookPicture books. Who doesn’t remember looking at a favorite picture book over and over until it became worn and tattered? Who doesn’t love sharing favorite picture books now with those eager little readers as they delight over the colors and drawings that come together to tell a story? To celebrate National Picture Book Month, we’re sharing an article from our archives by Jennifer Kelley Reed about creating a successful picture book celebration at your school.


Picture Book Month is “an international literacy initiative that celebrates the print picture book during the month of November” (http://picturebookmonth.com/). The initiative affords libraries, schools, and literacy organizations the opportunity to promote the power of the picture book. Our school has participated for the last five years, and each year we have been building on our experiences, extending the reach of the activities from the library to the classroom to students’ homes. Our most recent celebration was a success on many fronts—it reminded K-5 students about the richness, information, and enjoyment of picture books, boosted library circulation, and strengthened the connection from our school to students’ families.

Individualizing Student Experiences

In our latest observance, the celebration lasted for the entire month of November, and we focused activities on students’ individual connections with picture books. Students in grades three through five challenged themselves to read a specific number of picture books from one of three “neighborhoods” in the library: biographies, picture books, or nonfiction. They were encouraged to set realistic goals for themselves, and to keep in mind that they weren’t in competition with other students, but instead enjoying the opportunity to explore and read books in a neighborhood they didn’t often frequent. It was clear that students heard the message, with some committing to read ten books, while others committed to fifty.

For the students in grades one and two, we focused on a nonfiction Picture Book Month challenge. For the month of November, I had more students than ever before coming to the library to exchange books, sharing what they were learning while reading, and marking the numbers on their challenge sheets. (This video on my blog shows the state of the library in the midst of Picture Book Month: http://reederama.blogspot.com/2014/11/what-does-school-library-in-midst-of.html.) Continue reading “Growing Readers and Parent Involvement through Picture Book Month”