Your Data Toolkit: Gathering and Using Data to Improve Instruction (April 2017 Issue)

Subscribers: Browse our April 2017 bonus online issue at SLC online! In this issue, we explore how you can collect and use data to improve your library practice, advocate for your library program, and make your instruction more meaningful and effective.


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Table of Contents

Your Data Toolkit: Gathering and Using Data to Improve Instruction

Leading Positive Change through Strong Relationships and Communication By Priscille Dando

Thinking Outside the Lesson Plan Box: Designing Quick, Multi-layered Assessments By BJ McCracken

Developing a Meaningful Self-Assessment/Evaluation Instrument in Georgia By Phyllis Robinson Snipes Continue reading “Your Data Toolkit: Gathering and Using Data to Improve Instruction (April 2017 Issue)”

Coteaching: A Strategic Evidence-Based Practice for Collaborating School Librarians

moreillon_judiHave you preregistered for Dr. Judi Moreillon’s upcoming webinar on EdWeb, “Classroom-Library Coteaching 4Student Success“? Join Dr. Moreillon and our colleagues from Libraries Unlimited on October 13th at 5:00 PM EDT for an interactive exploration of strategies for identifying potential collaborative partners, electronic collaborative planning tools, providing evidence of the value and efficacy of classroom-library collaboration, and much more. The best part? Joining our EdWeb community, SLC @ the Forefront, is 100% free.

To whet your appetite we’re sharing this gem of Dr. Moreillon’s from the March 2016 issue. Happy collaborating!

The collaborative classroom teacher–school librarian model can take various forms. Educators can co-develop a library collection aligned with the classroom curriculum. They can co-plan schoolwide literacy events or promotions such as Love of Reading Week, Poetry Day, or the book fair. Educators can collaborate to plan for a makerspace or technology purchases. They can collaborate to develop strategies for integrating technology tools and resources into students’ learning. They can also coteach by co-planning, co-implementing, and co-assessing standards-based lessons and units of instruction. Of all of these collaborative possibilities, coteaching, has been shown to make a measurable difference in student learning outcomes. Continue reading “Coteaching: A Strategic Evidence-Based Practice for Collaborating School Librarians”