Serving Black Youth — Part Two

Yesterday we spoke with Dr. Sandra Hughes-Hassell and Dr. Casey H. Rawson to find out more about their new book. Today, we present a sneak peek of their new video workshop on SLC. This professional development workshop briefly covers some of the key concepts from their work on equity and the need to change our thinking about serving Black youth.

In this sneak peek, Dr. Hughes-Hassell discusses enabling texts, why they are important, and what to look for when including them in your collection.

Subscribers can access the full workshop here.

Libraries, Literacy, and African American Youth, edited by Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Pauletta Brown-Bracy, and Casey H. Rawson covers key research concepts and includes profiles of school (and public) libraries that are working to effect change.

 

Serving Black Youth — Part One

One of the new books from Libraries Unlimited that we’re particularly excited about is Libraries, Literacy, and African American Youth, edited by Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Pauletta Brown-Bracy, and Casey H. Rawson. This book tackles the issue of making libraries welcoming to Black youth and addressing the needs and desires of this population in the interests of promoting equity and social justice. The text covers key research concepts and provides illustrations of best practices by offering profiles of school (and public) libraries that are working to effect change.

In their introduction, the authors say that rather than a how-to guide, they want their book to “spur dialogue and reflection about how libraries must change” in order to better serve African American youth. In the interests of building on this dialogue, Dr. Hughes-Hassell and Dr. Rawson were gracious enough to answer  some questions for us about their work.

And, stay tuned! Sandra and Casey also created a professional development workshop for SLC on these same issues. Tomorrow we’ll post a sneak peek of the video.

Continue reading “Serving Black Youth — Part One”

“We Read Diverse Books: Connecting Our Diverse Collections to Our Instruction.” A Supplement for LIS Faculty

We are pleased to continue our series of learning experiences designed for use with school library candidates in graduate/professional programs, including pre-service school librarians and practitioners working as educators while earning their credentials. This month, Carl A. Harvey II, Topic Center Editor for Organization & Management, has provided a series of activities to help faculty in using the text from our May issue for assignment instructions or online course modules.

Current subscribers can access the referenced articles via the hyperlinks below. (Magazine subscribers who still need to register for their login credentials at no extra cost may do so here.) As always, new subscribers are warmly welcomed into the SLC community, or we invite you to sign up for a free preview of our online platform.

In this issue of School Library Connection, which focuses on how to connect our students to diverse books, Leslie Preddy reminds us that, “although diversity is currently a social and politicized buzzword, it is important for us to remember school libraries have a history with understanding and embracing diversity in our community. It is through meeting the needs of the populations we serve that we intentionally, and in a natural manner, incorporate compassion and respect through the instruction, programming, and collections we design for our schools.” In many articles this month, our authors explore the diverse collections found in our libraries and the diversity of the patrons who use them, offering potential connections and points of discussion to LIS courses that focus on collection development, children’s literature, young adult literature, and library instruction.
—Carl A. Harvey II, Instructor of School Librarianship, Longwood University, Farmville, VA Continue reading ““We Read Diverse Books: Connecting Our Diverse Collections to Our Instruction.” A Supplement for LIS Faculty”

Connecting Diverse Students with Diverse Collections

This month’s One-Question Survey revisited a question we asked back in 2011: “How much of your resource budget is spent on materials in languages other than English?” In analyzing the latest results, Dr. Maria Cahill sees positive developments and the nuances of collection development.

We hope you use these surveys to help you reflect on your own practices.  Subscribers can view our archive of past surveys here or check out the complete May issue, “We Read Diverse Books: Connecting Our Diverse Collections to Our Instruction,” here.

How Much of Your Resource Budget Is Spent on Materials in Languages Other than English?

 

 

In the write-up for the August 2011 One-Question Survey Gail Dickinson wrote, “We want our collections to reflect the faces of our students and the faces of our world. We want to present information and ideas to our students in packages that describe their world and the world beyond them. The last bastion of acceptance may be examining the collection to see if it fits the most basic definition, i.e. are the materials in the languages that our students speak?”

At that time, Gail concluded that school library collections did not reflect the diversity of the students, but she also acknowledged that it was possible, though not probable, that the 1QS participants might be serving “in schools where there are no speakers of other languages.” Coming back to this question nearly six years later, our results paint a much more positive picture, but they also point to the nuances of collection development. Continue reading “Connecting Diverse Students with Diverse Collections”

We Read Diverse Books: Connecting Our Diverse Collections to Our Instruction (May 2017 Issue)

Subscribers: Do you love diverse books? Check out our May issue in which we look at connecting these books with your instruction and practice. Find tips and advice for getting these books into the hands of your students.


Subscribers can click on the article titles below to read more.

Not yet a subscriber? What are you waiting for? Click here for more information and to sign up for a free trial.


Serving Rainbow Families in School Libraries by Jamie Campbell Naidoo

Let the Dodo Bird Speak!: A Rejoinder on Diversity in Children’s Books by Kafi Kumasi

Whose History Is It?: Diversity in Historical Fiction for Young Adults by April M. Dawkins

One-Question Survey. Connecting Diverse Students with Diverse Collections by Maria Cahill

Continue reading “We Read Diverse Books: Connecting Our Diverse Collections to Our Instruction (May 2017 Issue)”