Linking Literature to the Classroom

School Library Connection is pleased to collaborate with ALA President Julie Todaro and her school library group Task Force to provide access to a selection of key professional development articles aligned with essential professional competencies for school librarians. These articles were hand selected from our archives by an expert panel of librarians chaired by Susan Ballard, Dorcas Hand, and Sara Kelly Johns. This article concludes our blog series on SL-PSEL Competencies.

Competency 11: Literacy and Reading
“Linking Literature to the Classroom” by Naomi Bates. School Library Connection, June 2016.


As school librarians, we know the impact the library can have on classrooms. The difficult part is that other decision makers on campus may not see how important this classroom connection can be. In our educational age of standardized testing and curriculum alignment to state and federal guidelines, the library and librarian can be pushed to the side. Instead of being bullied out of the classrooms, however, we need to fight to stay in them. How we do it is an age-old adage: actions speak louder than words. One very important and creative way to show our importance to classrooms and academic achievement is through linking literature to the classroom. While state standards are the ruler by which lessons and academics are measured, creating personal connections between students and the subject matter enriches learning and achievement. We can do this by using literature to link students to subjects they study. Here are a few ideas to ponder for increased linking. Continue reading “Linking Literature to the Classroom”

Going for the Gold: Transformative School Library Partners

Olympic Rings

Valarie Hunsinger challenges librarians to think creatively in order to transform their library, you never know where it will lead. For Hunsinger, it led directly to Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas.

Subscribers to SLC can read more articles like this at School Library Connection.

Icely, a sixth grader in the Bronx, New York, can’t stop reading! It is impossible to find her without a book in hand. In the first few months of school, she has already read over fifty-four books and one million words! When asked why her reading has become so ravenous compared to the previous year, she says that she never wants to miss a “Gabby Douglas opportunity” again.
Many fellow students feel the same way. In 2012, students at Hyde Leadership Charter School in the Bronx (Hyde-Bronx) celebrated the Olympics by striving to “Go for the Gold” in their academic pursuits. Students who completed their summer reading journal started the year by receiving a reading gold medal from Ben Bratton, who was the youngest member to win a gold medal for America at the 2012 World Championships in Fencing.

Millionaires’ Challenge
After Bratton’s visit, the library launched a millionaires’ challenge. Students were challenged to read a million words, and I promised to find an Olympian to celebrate their huge accomplishment. As more and more students joined the Millionaires Club, the harder it seemed to find an Olympian, until one day my friend and corporate partner, Debra Braganza from City National Bank, called me and said, “I found an Olympian for you.” Little did I know that she had found one of the biggest Olympians—two-time gold medalist of the summer games, Gabby Douglas.
On May 1, 2013, fifty millionaire readers not only met Gabby Douglas at Barnes & Noble, but also received a signed copy of her newest book, Raising the Bar, thanks to City National Bank and Barnes & Noble. (The story can be found at: http://bronx.news12.com/news/students-in-hunts-point-soundview-meet-olympic-gold-medal-winner-gabby-douglas-1.5177727). Maria, an eighth grade student who read over five million words, said it was a day she would never forget for the rest of her life. It was also the day that I realized that in my library I must dream BIG and, even more importantly, I realized that to change the lives of my students, I needed partners that believe in big dreams! Continue reading “Going for the Gold: Transformative School Library Partners”

Let the Sounds of Summer Inspire You

TakeMeOutBallgameCoverHere’s something to think about when you’re enjoying summer music in the park: collaboration! In his most recent column, Stony Evans, describes ways to bring music into your school library for both enjoyment and curricular connections.

Subscribers to SLC can look forward to reading Stony’s next Advocacy in Reach column on encouraging student voice and choice in the library in the August/September issue. Subscribers can also read his past columns by visiting School Library Connection.

I spent the first twelve years of my career in education as a school band director. Even after leaving that career eight years ago to become a teacher librarian, I still enjoy a part-time career in music. As teacher librarians, our strengths and passions just may be contagious within the learning community. By maintaining relationships with local music teachers and musicians, I have brought music into the library whenever possible for enjoyment and curricular connections. Continue reading “Let the Sounds of Summer Inspire You”

It’s Always the Right Time to Find a Partner

Who do you work with in the community? For our Summer One-Question Survey, Maria Cahill asked about partnerships between the school library and the community, revealing both their popularity and the variety of organizations involved.

We encourage you to use these surveys to help you reflect on your own practices. Subscribers can view our archive of past surveys here.

Be a part of our next survey! 

SummerSurvey1

What’s a school librarian’s favorite greeting? Well, it should be, “Howdy partner!”

We asked school librarians to identify the community organizations and businesses with whom they partner, and we were impressed that more than 85% of the 400 respondents confirmed partnering with at least one community organization, agency, or business, and most of those librarians identified multiple community partners.

Continue reading “It’s Always the Right Time to Find a Partner”

Sneak Peek: Inquiry as a Lone Ranger

JaegerToday, we’re wrapping up a series of posts about creating deep learning experiences on a fixed schedule with this sneak peek of an eight-part workshop by School Library Connection’s own Paige Jaeger. Click the video below to watch. (Subscribers can view the complete workshop online here.) We know you’ll enjoy some of Paige’s ideas for leading the charge on inquiry learning as a “lone ranger” librarian. And thanks to Sue Kowalski for putting in a special request for these resources from #ALAAC16!

Inquiry as a Lone Ranger Librarian

ICYMI: Daniella Smith on Working with Public Libraries

With PLA meeting in Denver this week, it’s a perfect time to think about working with public libraries. Be sure to check out Dr. Daniella Smith’s recent SLC article about strategies for collaborating with public libraries. 

Nurturing Youth Pathways through Learning

Smith_DaniellaI attribute my experiences in public and school libraries with enabling me to understand the nuances that make both positions crucial to the development of young people. According to Barbara Immroth and Viki Ash-Geisler’s 1995 report, regardless of their location, libraries are institutions of education, whether it is formal or informal. Children are often introduced to their first organized educational experiences in public libraries. The library was my playground as a child, and this was by design.  Continue reading “ICYMI: Daniella Smith on Working with Public Libraries”