Sneak Peek: Gretchen McCord Tackles Copyright

 

How well do you get copyright, really? Many important aspects of copyright law are frequently misunderstood by K-12 librarians (and teachers, administration, and other K-12 educators), significantly diminishing the effectiveness of our educational system. School librarians have the opportunity to be leaders on copyright issues in their buildings and role models of good digital citizenship for their students.

Thankfully, Gretchen McCord, JD, MSIS, is here to help us out. In this free sneak peek of her eight-part video workshop on School Library Connection, McCord introduces us to her topic (above) and dispels some common myths about fair use guidelines (below). Subscribers can access the full workshop here, to learn more about the purpose of copyright law, licensing, the dangers of self-censorship, and how to develop effective school policies dealing with copyright.

FAIR USE GUIDELINES

 

Gretchen McCord, JD, MSIS, is an attorney specializing in copyright and other legal issues related to digital information. She is the founder and principal of Digital Information Law, which provides online and face-to-face training in copyright law and related areas and publishes a range of materials, including the quarterly journal Copyright & New Media Law, established in 1997. Gretchen currently serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the Freedom to Read Foundation’s Board of Trustees, the Amigos Library Services Board of Directors, and the American Library Association Legislative Subcommittee on Copyright. Her previous activities include serving on the City of Austin Library Commission, as President of the Friends of Libraries & Archives of Texas, and as President of the Texas Library Association. Gretchen is the author of, among other publications, the books What You Need to Know about Privacy Law: A Guide for Librarians and Educators (2013), Fair Use: The Secrets No One Tells You (2014), and Copyright in Cyberspace 1 and 2: Questions and Answers for Librarians.

gretchen@digitalinfolaw.com

www.digitalinfolaw.com

www.facebook.com/digital.information.law

Twitter: @GMcCordLaw

From the Archives: Celebrating the Ladies

By Kay Weisman

In North America, females outnumber males by about three percent, but books highlighting women’s contributions are not always so numerous. Share the following clustered titles with students to help them appreciate the accomplishments of women.

SCIENTISTS
Butzer, Anna. Maria Mitchell. Great Women in History series. Capstone, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-4914-0539-0; 24p., Gr. K-2.
This brief introduction to America’s first female astronomer explains how her interest in the stars developed and cites her professional accomplishments. Included are period photos, a timeline, and appended back matter.

Fertig, Dennis. Sylvia Earle: Ocean Explorer. Women in Conservation series. Heinemann, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-4846-0470-0; 48p., Gr. 3-6.
Fertig discusses Earle’s early inspirations and details her many undersea achievements. Full-color photos, diagrams, and generous back matter supplement this very readable text. Other series titles include Dian Fossey, Jane Goodall, and Rachel Carson.

Polacco, Patricia. Clara and Davie: The True Story of Young Clara Barton. Scholastic, 2014. ISBN: 978-0-545-35477-6; 40p., Gr. 2-4.
Polacco recounts an episode from American Red Cross founder Barton’s childhood detailing how older brother Davie protected, encouraged, and mentored her. Later, when Davie is hurt in a fall, Clara becomes his nurse, putting her healing powers to work.

Stone, Tanya Lee. Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell. Illus. by Marjorie Priceman. Holt, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-8050-9048-2; 40p., Gr. K-2.
In the 1830s girls were encouraged to become wives and mothers. Adventurous Elizabeth Blackwell defied that expectation, becoming America’s first female doctor despite first being turned down by twenty-eight medical schools. An author’s note and source list append this inspiring biography.

CONNECT & INVESTIGATE:
Both Polacco and Stone employ narrative frameworks. Discuss the portions of Barton and Blackwell’s lives covered by these texts. Where is other information placed? How do the illustrations contribute to these biographies? Butzer and Fertig apply a more traditional chronological approach to their works on Mitchell and Earle. Where is additional information placed in these texts? What information is conveyed in illustrations and graphics? (RI: K-6.1; RI: 1-6.5; RI: K-6.7)

Continue reading “From the Archives: Celebrating the Ladies”

ICYMI: Cahill on Our Co-Teaching Survey

“We’ve Come a Long Way, Baby!”

Cahill_coteaching 1QSIn case you missed the results of our recent One-Question Survey on co-teaching and co-planning across the disciplines at SLC’s online home, check out Dr. Maria Cahill’s always incisive analysis below. Our results show both encouraging gains and room for our professional growth as collaborators. (Click here to participate in our latest survey.)

That more than twice as many librarians, 384 total, responded to this month’s question compared to last month’s illustrates the importance of collaboration to school librarians! Continue reading “ICYMI: Cahill on Our Co-Teaching Survey”