Sneak Peek: Teaching Leadership

Think you’re not ready to be a leader? Too late, you already are! Gail Dickinson explains, “You decided to be a leader when you decided to become a school librarian.” As you will learn in her new video workshop, “Leadership is part of everything you do.”

In this six-minute sneak peak from her workshop, Gail Dickinson focuses on engaging parents in your school’s leadership curriculum. What do you want to ask of parents? How do you engage them in student learning in a meaningful way? Gail discusses how to identify what you want from parents and how to include them in building a culture of leadership at your school.

 

SLC subscribers can view the full workshop here.


dickinsonGail K. Dickinson, PhD, is associate dean of graduate studies and research at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. She earned her master’s in library science from the University North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and her doctorate in educational administration from the University of Virginia. Dickinson is a past-president of AASL, was editor-in-chief of Library Media Connection, and is the author of Achieving National Board Certification for School Library Media Specialists and coeditor of the seventh edition of Linworth’s School Library Management.

Sneak Peek: Tips for Using Primary Sources with Elementary Students

You can use primary sources with even your youngest students. Just in time for our November issue, “Get ‘Em Hooked with Primary Sources,” we have a new video workshop from Tom Bober on using primary sources with elementary school students.

Take a sneak peek:

 

In this six-minute lesson from his new video workshop “Primary Sources for Elementary,” Tom Bober offers ideas for using primary sources in science and literature classes and shares practical advice specifically for working with K–5 students.

 

If you love primary sources, or want to know more about using them with your students, be sure to visit School Library Connection. Subscribers can see the entire workshop, along with the rest of the new issue, here. Not yet a subscriber? Click here to learn more.


boberheadTom Bober is an elementary librarian at RM Captain Elementary in Clayton, MO, a former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress, and a Digital Public Library of America Community Rep. He has written about the use of primary sources in classrooms in Social Education magazine and the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog. Bober also presents at regional and national conferences, runs workshops, and has presented in Library of Congress webinars on a variety of strategies and topics for students’ use of primary sources in the classroom. Follow him on Twitter @CaptainLibrary.

Promoting and Evaluating Your Makerspace

preddyYou’ve set up a great makerspace. Now what?

How about taking four minutes to hear Leslie Preddy talk about how to promote and evaluate your efforts?

“Marketing & Evaluation of Your Makerspace” is a sneak peek of Leslie Preddy’s new professional development workshop, “School Library Makerspaces,” in which she shares her expertise on the how and why of having a makerspace in your school library.

 

Subscribers can access the entire eight-part workshop here.

preddyLeslie Preddy has served as school librarian at Perry Meridian Middle School in Indianapolis since 1992 and as an adjunct professor for Indiana University, Indiana State University, and IUPUI. She has presented webinars and is a frequent speaker and consultant at education conferences and events. She has published many articles in professional journals, co-created online resources for educators, and is the author of SSR with Intervention: A School Library Action Research Project, Social Readers: Promoting Reading in the 21st Century, and School Library Makerspaces. Preddy is a recipient of many awards including  AASL’s Collaborative School Library Media Award and Perry Township Schools Teacher of the Year.  She is Past-President of the American Association of School Librarians and the Association of Indiana School Library Educators. Preddy is a recent recipient of two grants for her school library makerspace from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, administered by the Indiana State Library.

Sneak Peek: The Power of Makerspaces with Leslie Preddy

 

This month at School Library Connection, we’re exploring the culture of making. A Gallup poll recently found that students say they have very few opportunities to develop their entrepreneurial energy. But nearly half of America’s students say they want to start their own business or invent something that changes the world. So what can we do as educators and school librarians to make a difference?

In this sneak peek from her School Library Makerspaces workshop, Leslie Preddy explores how making can help to foster an emotional connection between students and their learning and nurture the skills self-regulated learners need. Subscribers can access the entire eight-part workshop here, where you’ll also find practical guidance on choosing the right activities, safety, and the marketing and evaluation of your makerspace.

 

 

preddyLeslie Preddy has served as school librarian at Perry Meridian Middle School in Indianapolis since 1992 and as an adjunct professor for Indiana University, Indiana State University, and IUPUI. She has presented webinars and is a frequent speaker and consultant at education conferences and events. She has published many articles in professional journals, co-created online resources for educators, and is the author of SSR with Intervention: A School Library Action Research Project, Social Readers: Promoting Reading in the 21st Century, and School Library Makerspaces. Preddy is a recipient of many awards including  AASL’s Collaborative School Library Media Award and Perry Township Schools Teacher of the Year.  She is Past-President of the American Association of School Librarians and the Association of Indiana School Library Educators. Preddy is a recent recipient of two grants for her school library makerspace from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, administered by the Indiana State Library.

 

Sneak Peek: Elementary Makerspaces with Marge Cox

 

This month at School Library Connection, we’re exploring the culture of making—looking at how innovative practitioners use school library makerspaces not only to meet STEM learning goals, but also goals for ELA, Social Studies, and other curriculum areas.

In this sneak peek from her eight-part workshop on creating great makerspaces for the elementary grades, 2016 AASL School Library Program of the Year winner Marge Cox shares a few simple ideas for makerspace activities for math and social studies. Subscribers can access the entire workshop here, where you’ll find more great ideas for makerspace activities across the curriculum as well as helpful tips for assessment, marketing, and finding funding.

 

 

 

coxMarge Cox is the library media specialist at Collier County Schools in Naples, Florida. Her efforts were recently recognized when her school won the 2016 AASL National School Library Program of the Year Award. She is also the co-author of The Library Media Specialist in the Writing Process.

Defend Students’ Intellectual Freedom

adams1This month at School Library Connection, we’ve been focusing on all the ways our school libraries serve as incubators for our democracy. But creating a space that nurtures our “citizens-in-training” is about more than just our instruction, it’s also about ensuring students’ free access to resources representing diverse points of view. Giving students the opportunities they need to practice civic skills goes hand in hand with defending students’ intellectual freedom as we train the future leaders of our world.

In this sneak peek from her Intellectual Freedom workshop, Helen Adams gives a basic overview of how and why you should be an advocate for intellectual freedom at your school. Subscribers can access the entire workshop here, where you’ll also find practical step-by-step guidance on selection policies, navigating through challenges to materials, and protecting students’ intellectual freedom online.


Helen R. Adams, MLS, is an online instructor for Antioch University-Seattle in the areas of intellectual freedom, privacy, and copyright. She formerly worked as a school librarian in Wisconsin, and served as president of AASL. She is a member of the ALA American Libraries Advisory Committee, the ALA Privacy Subcommittee, and the AASL Knowledge Quest Advisory Board, and she is the author of Protecting Intellectual Freedom and Privacy in Your School Library (Libraries Unlimited 2013).

Sneak Peek: Engaging the Learning Community

According to a national study on young people and volunteering, having friends that volunteer regularly is the primary factor influencing a young person’s own volunteering habits—in other words, more influential than the actual cause is the social context. Only 19% of those who volunteered came up with the idea to volunteer themselves. More than half, 57%, were invited by someone: a friend, family member, or other adult. So, what might be the roles for the school library here?

In her video series with School Library Connection, “Engaging the Learning Community,” Dr. Rebecca Morris explores the why and how of creating a social or collaborative context for learning, including involving adults from the school and from the broader community. In this sneak peek (below), Morris looks at how the school library can accomplish these goals through service learning and volunteering . The full workshop—with coverage including performing a needs assessment, engaging the learning community via makerspaces, and creating a community reading culture—is available to School Library Connection subscribers here.

SERVICE LEARNING & VOLUNTEERING

Does Your Library Space Participate in Learning?

Sullivan3Summer can be a great time to take a step back to consider your library space. In Library Design for Learning, Margaret L. Sullivan challenges us to look at the library space in a new way. She asks, “What if we ask more of our buildings?” “What if we ask them to participate in the pedagogy that they support?”

This 8-part video workshop shows you how changes to your library space can enhance student learning. Whether your focus is inquiry, direct instruction, blended learning, or something else, she shows how big or small changes to your space can help make the most of your efforts.

Click the video below to watch the lesson on supporting STEM and STEAM in the library. (Subscribers can view the full workshop here).


Margaret L. Sullivan, MA, is an independent consultant and principal at Library Resource Group, LLC. She holds a master’s degree in communication arts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her published works include articles on space planning in School Library Journal, Knowledge Quest, Teacher Librarian, and American School & University and she is the author of High Impact School Library Spaces: Envisioning New School Library Concepts (Libraries Unlimited, 2014).

Sneak Peek: Inquiry as a Lone Ranger

JaegerToday, we’re wrapping up a series of posts about creating deep learning experiences on a fixed schedule with this sneak peek of an eight-part workshop by School Library Connection’s own Paige Jaeger. Click the video below to watch. (Subscribers can view the complete workshop online here.) We know you’ll enjoy some of Paige’s ideas for leading the charge on inquiry learning as a “lone ranger” librarian. And thanks to Sue Kowalski for putting in a special request for these resources from #ALAAC16!

Inquiry as a Lone Ranger Librarian

Sneak Peek: Create Your Learning Commons with Pam Harland

 

Are you empowering your students as experts? In her video series with School Library Connection, Pam Harland will walk you through seven steps you can take to transform your school library into a vibrant learning commons. In this sneak peek (below), Harland provides numerous ideas for how you can start tapping into your students’ passions and skills to empower and engage. The full workshop—with coverage including connecting students with information, using space as a resource, and the virtual learning commons—is available to School Library Connection subscribers here.

 

Pam Harland MLIS, is a librarian at Plymouth Regional High School in Plymouth, NH. She has worked in public libraries, academic libraries, and at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston as a research librarian. Harland received the 2009 Intellectual Freedom Award from the New Hampshire School Library Media Association and is the recipient of the 2010 New Hampshire Excellence in Education Award for Educational Media Professionals. She is the author of The Learning Commons: Seven Simple Steps to Transform Your Library (Libraries Unlimited, 2011).